Reader Comments

Hello, and if you’re reading this far then you must have liked the books! My blogs have been up for over a year, and I have finally gotten around to a comments page. (For earlier comments, look around–they’re attached to everything.) So if you have comments/questions about the books, this is the place.

A comment of my own: one of the best ways to thank writers for a great experience is to express your enthusiasm on the sales-site where you discovered their stories. In my case this means Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble (BN.com). Even if the review is nothing more than “Great book!” and a star-rating, the reader ratings have an effect on search rankings when buyers are surfing the titles of different genres and categories. In other words, good ratings mean increased sales. Think of it as tipping the piano-man on the way out.

-Marion G. Harmon

72 Responses to Reader Comments

  1. Aaron says:

    I have two words for you:
    WRITE FASTER.
    I just finished both WTC books (I’ll be giving you glowing reviews on Amazon directly) and absolutely adored them. I love your universe, your characters, and your style. I snagged Wearing the Cape on a whim, and boy am I glad I did! It’s always an iffy proposition trying unknown authors (and new genres), but I will gleefully purchase anything that has your name on it from this point forward.
    Cheers!

  2. Andrew says:

    Okay, I just got Wearing the Cape yesterday. I am about halfway through. I have one big question to start off with:

    How could you not find a publisher for this book? It is a solid story, tightly written, with a great premise. You have done an amazing job in creating a full environment, from Hope’s family, to the Bees (VERY nice touch), to a range of experiences moving the story along.

    You flesh out the rest of the Sentinels very well, just enough without making them a distraction to the thrust of the story. Your philosophical musings are very interesting, particularly the time-travel ideas, and I liked the disagreement Hope has with Atlas about the Brotherhood-Boys fight. You go in-depth on the tropes of your story, examining details like costumes, patrols, and team-ups, that add depth to the story, and do not distract. Your various characters are likable, without being mushy. And while I am male, I am married, and grew up with two sisters, and I think you write very well from Hope’s POV. I would be intrigued by a woman’s perspective on your story, and may ask my wife to read the book when I am done.

    I am curious about a few things. First, are you a fan of Andrew Greeley’s novels? Father Nolan sounded a bit like Bishop Blackie. Second, are you familiar with Paragons from Green Ronin Publishing? It is a setting “toolkit” for the Mutants and Masterminds RPG, with a similar basic premise to your Event, and they discuss “origin chasers” in the book. I do see you are a GURPS player, so I wondered if you had seen that supplement.

    I am not going to tell you this book is perfect, by any means, but it is a great read. It reminds me a bit of Mercedes Lackey’s first Valdemar book, Arrows of the Queen, which was also a great read, even though it seemed to be trying to tell a whole lot of stories instead of just one, resulting in some side stories coming out of the blue to take over the main storyline. I enjoyed it, and thought it was quite good, with a few caveats. I think the same here, except I think you are far more focused, keeping the storyline tight on your first person narrator.

    I did note one detail that threw me: Hope’s cancer. You reference it as a cover story, but the first part of Hope’s narration only mentions that she got sick. It just struck me as an odd place to drop the Big C, revealing the nature of her sickness. Overall, a minor misstep.

    Thank you for your efforts. I have been reading a lot of superhero prose fiction, and yours is up there with the best I have read so far. Devil’s Cape by Rob Rogers was probably my favorite, for his characterization, dialog, and pacing. Soon I Will Be Invincible was very good, but very…deconstructionist. I also got tired of Grossman’s playing with archetypes. You do, also, but I think more effectively, and with an eye to telling your story, in your way, with characters that may reflect archetypes, but remain original. I kept feeling like Grossman actually wanted to be telling a Superman-Batman-Wonder Woman story. In my mind, Elliot S. Maggin’s Superman novels set a hell of a standard, but many worthy writers have followed suite. You are one of those writers. Thank you for sharing your story with us. I look forward to continuing the journey with you.

    • George says:

      Glad to hear you’re enjoying it–hope the end lives up to the rest for you!
      To answer your questions:
      Publishing is a business, so agents and publishers look for what they believe will sell. Superhero fiction is a very new and narrow genre and I am an unknown author. ‘Nuff said.
      Congratulations! You are the first reader who has mentioned Blackie Ryan. Father Nolan is a complete steal–I prefer to call it an “homage.” More seriously, the Punk is one of my favorite characters; when the plot called for a priest I just couldn’t resist paying tribute to Greeley’s genius.
      I am familiar with Paragons. I don’t know when it was published, but my brother called it to my attention while I was in the throes of creating the post-Event world and I even own a copy. I’d already picked up the theme of origin chasers from a DC comic (Bulleteer) that came out a few years ago, and decided it was a necessary consequence of any superhero world where powers arise from “accidents.” Probably my biggest departure from Paragons is simply that I have never tried to explain the Event–not even to myself on paper. And I never will.

      Lastly, I’m very flattered by the company you put me in; I hope my writing continues to meet your expectations.
      -George

      • Andrew says:

        I just finished the book. You do not disappoint!

        I will type up a review for Amazon.com. Now, I just have to find the money for Villains, Inc.

      • George says:

        Cool–I look forward to reading it and hope Villains Inc. continues the trend.

  3. Kevin kenney says:

    George, just finished Bite Me, and as I expected, I enjoyed it very much. Do you want/need/accept unsolicited editing comments? I found a couple of words mispelled, and would be happy to tell you about them if you do. Very minor things really, in a truly fun read. I am looking forward to whatever you release next.
    S,
    Kevin

  4. Kevin Kenney says:

    George, Amazon review posted. I hope my review sparks interest. I truly enjoyed the book, and my review reflects this fact. The two spelling errors I noted in the text are:
    location 3277 (near the end) it mentions going from hanger to hanger, but airplanes are stored inside Hangars. Location 3027 when discussing wine MC talks of “nose and pallet”, but I think he means nose and palate. I hope these help, and aren’t too nitpicky!
    Best,
    Kevin

    • George says:

      Not at all. When something like this happens I check the spellings in my master file, correct as needed, and sooner or later the change is formatted and uploaded to Amazon. Meanwhile I’m relieved–these are small enough most won’t notice.

  5. Maurice Palmen says:

    Marvelous writing, to summarize all my reactions so far.
    Keep up the good work.

    I would like to know if ‘Bite Me’ will be available in paper format as well, in the near future.
    This as I don’t own, nor will purchase, an e-reader.

  6. redgoatgamer says:

    Hey Mark,

    I have really enjoyed reading WTC, Villian Inc and Bite Me. When do you plan to publish another? and what happened to “Casper the Unfriendly Ghost”?

    • George says:

      “Casper” will certainly play a part in the next Bite Me book–the reason I included him. I’m currently working on Young Sentinels, the third Wearing the Cape story.

  7. Dan Strelek says:

    I’ve read WTC, Villains Inc. , and just finished Bite Me. All three are awesome, and I eagerly await future stories. One thing I would like to share is this. I’ve always been good at creative writing myself, but could never seem to sit down and write, or come up with an idea that I could possibly put into a feature length novel. I too also play the pen and paper RPG’s (most recently the awesome new Marvel system). To shorten this up, I decided to create my own world for my group, and it was your books that inspired me. At first I was going to just use your world for the setting, but one morning I was dozing in bed, and Bam! Bam! Bam!…. idea after idea after idea popped into my head. So I researched the aspects I needed to for realism, and wrote the beginning of the story. It’s definitely mine, and quite different from your world, but it was your wonderful work that inspired me. I’m still writing it, putting it together. Everyone that’s read it so far has loved it, and my group is really looking forward to playing in it. But I would like to thank you for showing me a new type of superhero story, and I really look forward to reading what you come up with next.

    -Dan

    • George says:

      Thank you! I’m sure your new campaign will be a great success–and perhaps you’ll be able to write out your adventures. The superhero genre needs more creative stories.

  8. AM says:

    Mr. Harmon,
    First I want to say, great work on Wearing the Cape and Villains, Inc. Loved ‘em both. Have yet to find time in my schedule for more. I’m a huge fan of super-fellow prose–which is rather sparse in availability and typically of questionable quality–and sated my fix for it primarily by playing and roleplaying in City of Heroes (rest in peace, little game that could!). Your books filled a void for me, and are part of what inspired me to start writing my own.
    I’m working on a little ditty called “Malevolence” in my spare time, and have gotten about 3/4s through a complete rewrite after finishing a draft. I expect it to come in just shy of 75k words, so it’d be a novella by anyone’s standards. I’ve also started laying the groundwork for a sequel as ideas come to me. Anyway, the story of “Malevolence” centers around a recently-paroled supervillain returning to the world of capes and tights, and finding that he may be irrelevant. When he discovers that while he was incarcerated, his creations were put to use by another supervillain to aid in their plot to take over the world, he isn’t happy–to say the least. And so he take his mission of revenge out to not only the colorful, arrogant heroes of the world he lives in, but his brethren villains as well.
    I would be keen to send you the final draft when it’s done, edited, and polished, for your thoughts as a fellow writer of super-person fiction whose work I admire and respect.
    Best of luck with all your other projects and have a great holiday season!
    Regards,
    Alexander

    • George says:

      Congratulations on finishing a full manuscript! Great ideas are everywhere–actually finishing is a major achievement. I appreciate the offer of a pre-publication draft. However, between my own research and writing, I have so little reading time that my to-read list has already grown to epic size (there are even new releases in much-loved series I have yet to get to). Occasionally, as today, I spot something I can’t ignore, but mostly I’m just trying to keep my head down and soldier on. That said, if you still wish to send me a copy I will be happy to put it in my to-read stack. I hope Malevolence is only the first of many.

      M.G.Harmon

      • AM says:

        Hello again! I’d love to send you a copy of the first novella in the series. I can toss you a PDF in the very near future, but just need to know where to send it! Thanks again!

      • George says:

        mgharmon@embarqmail.com. Again, no idea when I can read or comment on it. If you’ll take a suggestion, I recommend checking out writer-sharing sites such as Youwriteon.com as a means of getting honest and wide-ranging critiques on your work. I put all three of my current-published stories (the first 7,000 words of each, anyway) through that site, and comments I received helped Big Time.

      • AM says:

        Hi George! Thanks again for the reply. I only *just* got notified about it again. I’ll send you a copy in the next few days, and will certainly check out the site you recommended.

      • AM says:

        Thanks for letting me send you the PDF. Any formatting issues and typos you may find in what I sent are resolved, and the eBook is live @ https://tinyurl.com/afetn6a Thanks for your support, and please let me know what you think when you do get a chance to read it!

  9. Thomas Conder says:

    I just have one little request. I love the covers for the books, but it would be nice to see a picture of Hope without the mask and wig. Hope instead of Astra. Maybe Shelly, too. Odd, I know, but it would be nice to see her as herself. The stories are fabulous, by the way.

    • George says:

      Funny you should ask. Since my cover artist charges a pretty penny (worth it!) for her work, I don’t foresee any non-cover character sketches coming any time soon. However, here’s this; I always had a picture of Hope in my mind, and then I saw her on TV the other day–it was an interview with AnnaSophia Robb. Not the same, yet the same, if you know what I mean.

      For Shelly I’ve got nothing besides “freckled redhead.” Sorry.

  10. Probably Not Sarah says:

    All three books out so far have been a treat to read. Wearing the cape was an Amazon recommendation and sitting on the back burner of my list until I discovered it was set in Oak Park / Chicago. Some of my fondest memories of gaming are from playing a hero set in Oak Park so I had to read it. I am so glad I did. Thanks for writing them!

  11. I am continuing to love these books – I’ve read the first two WTC books twice now, read “Omega Night” in fifteen minutes, and now I’m enjoying “Bite Me.” Also – when I purchased “Bite Me” for my Kindle, it was $7.99! I think that’s great that your books are now getting more “standard” pricing, because it implies a certain amount of marketability.

    Now, this makes me wonder – and forgive me if this is a prying question – has self publishing allowed you to quit your “day job” and write full time? Or to perhaps frame the question in a less personal way, do you feel that writers who self-publish have the potential to do so with enough success that they can become full time writers?

    Also – the “Capeverse” is awesome! Have you ever toyed with the idea of allowing other folks to contribute to the setting, a la “Wild Cards”?

    • George says:

      I’m happy that my stories have made it to your Reread List. I am, in fact, making more money on my books now than I am on my extremely part-time day job and I am trying to transition into a “professional” writing career. As to doing multi-author anthologies a la Wild Cards or Ring of Fire, I would love to–but that will have to wait until I have an agent and publisher who can handle the legal details. As an aside, I suspect that the first sign that the Wearing the Cape books have truly arrived will be the appearance of fanfic. (Not sure I’m looking forward to that–it depends on the content.)

  12. AM says:

    I’d do the same if I weren’t so caught up in writing the sequel to my own superhero fic. Conflict of interest, ya know? :)

  13. Wasseck says:

    Read the four stories on Kindle, really like them. Astera and Artemis characters feel real to me(good job),their world too.
    From your style I thought you were female(suprising). Looking forward to the next.
    Been wondering what all the people look like,I’m kinda used to manga and other graphic novels. Maby somebody can get it done. Reading “Bite me” I didn’t get the referances to Baron Samedi or the Lucy or Mina type girls. I hope the next one comes out soon.

    • George says:

      Glad you enjoyed the books. Baron Samedi is a loa (look him up on Wikipedia). Lucy and Mina were characters in Brahm Stoker’s Dracula novel. Lucy was blonde, Mina dark-haired.

  14. ereshkigala says:

    First of all, let me congratulate you on a well-described, fairly realistic word, plotlines that make sense, likeable and human characters and a fresh viewpoint into how the public at large would really respond to the appearance of superpowers. Some or all of the above are often missing from superhero fiction (in comics or otherwise) and they are the primary reasons I started reading your series. I found out about Wearing the Cape in the internet while doing an active search for some superhero fiction to read in fantastic.fiction.co.uk and have been a fan ever since.

    Now, something I wanted to ask for some time that struck me as odd. Astra can lift 9-10 tons before having to put real effort, right? Yet we see her having serious problems “pushing against the air” when getting close to the speed of sound. Now, a human in freefall has a terminal velocity of up to 200 mph in low altitude, where his own weight is fully countered by aerodynamic drag. Said drag increasing at the square of velocity, if that 200-pound man was pushed by 100 times the force -by Astra’s own strength for example- they should go at 10 times the velocity, or 2000 mph (Mach 3). So why is Astra so much slower than she should be given her strength, especially since she’s got much less drag than a 200-pound man? Ditto for the felt acceleration in, say, Omega Night. A single extra g of acceleration for one minute gives a speed of Mach 2 so if she was pulling enough gs to risk blacking out…

    I realize I’m talking physics applied to a world with superpowers but it should be noted the real-life skydiving speed record (albeit at really high altitudes) is 1.25 Mach for a perfectly normal guy merely falling and that fighter jets that outfly Atlas-types in your books have thrust/weight ratios of maybe 2:1 while Astra would have nearly 200:1…

    • There are several reasons why Astra’s lifting capacity might not translate into flight speed at a 1/1 ratio; one might be the difference between simply lifting something (a single action) and lifting the same object over and over and over and over and over etc. However, the truth is that I based Astra’s flight speed and lifting capacity on the levels appropriate for a 2,000 point Archetype template using the most recent edition of GURPS Supers–a game system which treats strength and flight as two completely separate powers. So you’re right: if you treat Astra’s lifting strength and her flight as two sides of the same power, the ability to exert force, they don’t add up.

      Glad you enjoyed Omega Night enough to break it down–that one was fun to write.

      • ereshkigala says:

        Thanks for the quick reply – and yes, I enjoyed Omega Night immensely after I put my inner physicist under a temporary sensory deprivation spell. :)

        Regarding Astra’s powers, from what I’m reading in general she doesn’t really have superstrength in the same way Rush doesn’t really have superspeed. If she were truly superstrong, she’d be at least as fast as Rush outside Hypertime – imagine someone that can throw punches, turn around and take steps as fast as they can blink since the weight of their own bodies would be irrelevant compared to their strength and their largest moves would be as fast as their smallest. If an advanced typist can type 600 letters per minute, an individual with real superstrength and the same dexterity could punch you 10 times per second.

        PS:
        That Archetype is underoptimized. I accidentally leveled Belfast in a 850-point GURPS game a few years ago. “Uncontrollable” and nuke-level powers are a bad combo. :)

  15. Linda says:

    Hi George,
    It was great to meet you at Comic Con this past weekend. I downloaded your book and am excited to check it out. Maybe we’ll see you again at another show soon, or feel free to keep in touch.

  16. George Reed says:

    Hello George,
    Just thought I’d drop a line. I have enjoyed your books since I found “A Superhero Story” around a year ago which of course led me straight on to “Villains Inc”. I’ve been a comic fan for decades, and I love the new perspective on the supers that your bringing to the genre. I look forward to reading your new books as they come out and hopefully your a fast and prolific author!

    I also thought I would let you know that Salt Lake is having its first ever ComicCon in September (5-7), I know your not doing much of these yet, but I figured since its practically (ok, 5-6 hour drive) in your back yard, maybe you could see about attending. Would love to see you there and to introduce you and your books to more of my friends. I’ll leave you the link to it, JUST incase your interested.

  17. George says:

    Thank you. Not doing a table, but may go as a fan this year…

  18. Lannithora says:

    Hello first off huge fan love your work. Secondly can you give us a update on when the Young Sentinals is coming out? Really want to read it after reading the first three chapters on this site.

  19. fatolbaldguy says:

    I have read them all. They are great,Villains Inc being my favorite. You cannot write these fast enough to suit me. But I think that is my problem and not yours. You make me want to write Perhaps I will. One tiny Nit, Ron, Don Max Fisher? His name changed twice over the series. I liked Ron. Ron is never the hero he is always the side kick Ron Stoppable, Ron Weasley come to mind. My name is Ron so I may be a little biased. Bring back Ron!
    Lei Zi,. Perhaps I missed it but I don’t believe you have ever described her costume. I picture her in Black battle dress but that’s just my mind. Being she’s Chinese I picture her as being only a little taller than Hope. She must have an imposing character to command a group like the Sentinels. I would request a better picture of her for my mind maybe in the next book which you are writing at a feverish pace to please me.
    Thank you for what I believe to be the best superhero series written to date. You go places I would never of expected to go in this series

  20. Ken Peters says:

    I use to play a game called City of Heroes. It was killed by NcSoft a year ago so I can’t play it anymore, but I was wondering if you had ever played it? The Wearing the cape stories are so much like it in many ways. The Star emblem at the beginning of e very chapter has been on the chest of many of my characters and was the symbol for my first Super Group. Also Atlas is the name of a fallen Hero in the game. His huge Statue was in the first main zone of the game, a place called Atlas Park. For these reasons and others I love your books. I am still and have always been a major Superman fan.

  21. Jeffrey says:

    First of all, I’ve read all the books so far and loved all of tthem. Have some questions though.

    1. If there is ever another Jacky book will we see if Jacky fears being decapitated again ( aside from the obvious reasons) in case it makes her undead again?

    2. In the beginning of most chapters a doctor, author, or psychiatrist make statements. But what do famous comic book authors think of their world now filled with super beings?

    3. Do you think Stan Lee could ever give out a comment ( as if he were aa character in the story? I mean if mutants and other supers started appearing in real life I bet people would like to hear a comment from Stan.

    4. In a world where there are real super heroes do comic book ones still exist? are they still making stories about them? I know that Superman and Batman are the biggest archetypes that the heroes use to create their personas but since that statement was made ( I think in villains inc.) they haven’t been mentioned.

    5. Will the teatime anarchist ever appear again? Either as a younger version or a reincarnation? Kinda a of a fan.

    • George says:

      Interesting questions…

      1.) You can bet that Jacky does in fact worry about that. She likes solid food and sunshine.

      2./3.) Thought about that, then I realized that I didn’t know how Stan Lee would feel about being fictionalized in a “competitor’s” story and decided not to find out.

      4.) Aside from the mention I made of Superman and Batman, I’ve avoided referring to any trademarked comic-book superheroes. Legally I can reference them all I want to, so long as I don’t write fiction about them, but I still don’t want to give Marvel or DC’s lawyers (and by extension, Disney’s and Warner Brother’s lawyers) any reason to pay attention to me.

      5.) There are a couple of sneaky ways I could bring the Teatime Anarchist back (and I liked him too!), but I’m avoiding the comic-book trope of resurrecting heroes and villains. I know, I know, Jacky and Shelly kind of fit the trope, but they were already dead when the story began and, anyway, they were only “mostly dead.” (And bonus points for knowing where that phrase came from.)

      Glad you’ve enjoyed the stories!

  22. George Reed says:

    Going for the bonus points!

    Princess Bride

  23. Max says:

    Mr. Harmon, I was wondering what the differences between Atlas and Ajax-types are, except for the fact that Ajax-types can’t fly.

    • George says:

      Objectively, that’s pretty much it. They may also tend to be a bit stronger and tougher than an Atlas-type in the same class, and they don’t have heightened senses. Think of the Atlas-types as Superman without all the extras (x-ray vision, heat vision, super-breath, super-speed, etc), and Ajax-types as the Thing, the Hulk, Colossus, or Juggernaut.

  24. Max says:

    Mr. Harmon, has the possibility of breakthroughs had an impact on the violent crime rate? Murders, muggings, rape etc. After all, there’s always the possibility that the victim will have a breakthrough and attempt to rip of their assailant’s head, as we saw with Crash. The same with bullying. For example, the jocks harass some poor guy until he has a breakthrough and sets them on fire.

    Wouldn’t at least some criminals be less inclined to commit violent crimes, out of a sense of self-preservation if nothing else?

    • George says:

      I’m sure it does have some small effect, but keep in mind that breakthroughs are rare events–the chances of a bullying episode triggering a breakthrough are one in thousands, for example. More likely than getting struck by lightning, but less likely than getting in a car accident. So while a few people might be more cautious–especially as the media tends to hugely publicize dramatic and public breakthroughs–lots of people will just shrug and ignore the very minor chance that their crimes might reap immediate karma.

  25. Andrew says:

    Mr. Harmon:

    I have been reading some of the original Avengers issues in the Marvel Masterworks, and I ran across the issue featuring the origin of Wonder Man, where Baron Zemo used an ionic ray device to give Simon Williams his powers. I also noted that in Wearing the Cape, some vampires could sire vampires, basically causing a breakthrough on someone who might not otherwise have a breakthrough. So, here is my question: could a Verne type create a device, such as an “ionic ray” machine, that could cause a breakthrough for another person?

    • George says:

      Probably not. Consider: breakthroughs are shaped to some degree by expectations, and yet out of the couple dozen or so supernatural breakthroughs who have become “vampires”–a supernatural being practically defined by his parasitic and reproducible nature–only one vampire, maybe two, have actually reproduced. That argues pretty strongly that the source of a breakthrough lies solely in the subject, and that generalists like Verne-types will have even less luck no matter how hard they try. At best, they might be able to trigger and “shape” the breakthrough of someone who might have manifested powers on his own. The possibility of someone actually doing it still keeps the DSA up at night, though.

      On a more meta-textual level, I’m never going to write a reliable or even semi-reliable breakthrough-machine into the stories; it would seriously break the world.

  26. Daniel says:

    Love your work (have all the books on Kindle and paper). While re-reading the first book for the upteenth time, I was curious if you had a picture of Astra’s original costume (since the one on the cover is the second). Then I tried making a rough approximation with a basic female form from the internet. How off is it? http://fav.me/d7cobz3

    • George says:

      How very, very retro! And not even close to what was in my head. Truthfully, I had based my take on the vest-and-shorts off of Robin (without the sleeves and a lower neckline). But the cool thing about novels is you provide just enough description for the reader to hang his imagination on. It’s all good.

  27. Chris says:

    Just finished reading all three Wearing the Cape books (and Bite Men), and really enjoyed them. However, I do have a couple of questions:

    1. Something that’s been bugging me about Artemis/Jacky – is she technically a breakthrough? I know the guy who sired her was, but since she’s a rare case of a vampire being created the “classic” way, I found myself being curious as to her exact nature in regards to the broader spectrum of superpowered beings. Does her nature make her “just” a vampire, or is she a breakthrough whose particular creation and nature got dictated by Psycho Vlad?

    2. This one might be kind of spoilery, but do you have any plans to further explore superpowered beings beyond the admittedly broad category of breakthroughs (ie aliens, pre-Event supernaturals,, etc.) We’ve got a couple of maybe-cases of things like this (if Hecate’s demons were the genuine article and Ozma is what she says she is), but do you have any intention of getting more specific or detailed? Of course, if the WTC-verse version of Darkseid/Thanos/insert apocalyptically powerful cosmic being of choice is out there, that seems like the sort of thing that would be saved for a grand finale reveal…

    3. I’m kind of sorry to bug you on this one, admittedly, but do you have any concrete info on the next book/further Wearing the Cape stories/further Artemis stories at this time?

    Thank you very much!

    • George says:

      Glad you enjoyed the stories. To answer your questions in order:

      Artemis is a “guided” breakthrough (the fact that she exists has the DSA watching all vampires very carefully to see if any more master-vampire types appear and try and start Vampire Armageddon).

      By default, the assumption of the scientific community is that all “supernatural” powers must be breakthrough-caused. And since there is no way to tell if something supernatural, such as a demon, is a breakthrough-created projection or Something Other, there is no way to prove that someone like Ozma is either delusional or exactly what she says she is. All pre-Event manifestations of the supernatural are, of course, impossible to verify scientifically.

      The next book, Small Town Heroes, should be out by the end of July. Hopefully. Working hard on it.

      -George

  28. lluang says:

    Here is an article that you may like. A real live breakthrough :-)

    NEW BRIGHTON, Minn. (AP) — A Good Samaritan showed “superhuman strength” when he bent the door of a burning SUV and rescued another motorist on a Minnesota freeway.
    . . .
    Renning gripped the door frame, braced his foot against the door and pulled. The State Patrol says the door bent in half and the glass shattered. Renning doesn’t know how he was able to open the door. Johannes says he plans to thank Renning.

    http://www.winonadailynews.com/news/state-and-regional/mn/good-samaritan-rescues-man-from-burning-suv/article_0f33dcf6-a624-5428-9f4a-440586c7d292.html

  29. Karl Weiss says:

    Can you give us an update on when the next book is coming out? Thanks!

    • George says:

      Wish I could give you a firm date. Right now all I can say is “Hopefully by the end of August.” I know, it sucks. Small Town Heroes is proving one of the hardest stories I’ve had to wrestle; hopefully it will be worth the wait.

  30. fatolbaldguy says:

    I loved the art for the game. Atlas and Astra flying is wonderful. You are going to alert us as your artist releases images of the other characters. Write faster:)

  31. DJ Fulton says:

    I was thinking about WtC today and it occurred to me that childbirth if very stressful… so are there more female breakthroughs? What do hospitals have in place to deal with breakthroughs? What do the Police, Firefighters, & EMTs have to deal with breakthroughs? Is yoga &/or meditation a required class in public schools?

  32. Karl Weiss says:

    Thanks for the update. I’ve enjoyed the other books and look forward to reading the new one.

  33. DJ Fulton says:

    I just had a horrible thought… Bridezilla breakthrough! Fathers are crying, grooms are running in terror!! Mothers are fainting!!

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